OPEN HOUSE for a new two level commercial office building proposed at 1105 East 900 South by Northstar Builders

OPEN HOUSE for a new two level commercial office building proposed at 1105 East 900 South by Northstar Builders

Written by East Central

Topics: Active, Development, Douglas, Home

Northstar Builders  has purchased the property located at 1105 East 900 South (previously the Clay Blackburn Insurance Agency). Northstar, represented by Sugarhouse Architects, is proposing a planned development to build a new two story office building ( two story – above grade with a basement below) for retail and restaurant space. The planned development process is needed because the developer has requested to decrease the front and corner side yard setbacks.

The City has scheduled an open house to gather input regarding this project on Thursday February 16, 2017 from 5:00-7:00 p.m. at the Tenth East Victory Park Senior Center (237 South 1000 East). Everyone welcome.

Proposed 1105 East 900 South

Additional details and pictures of the current site and the plans for the site are included in the following documents:

Project Info Sheet – PD for CommercialOffice 1105 E 900S – PLNSUB2017-00068

PLNSUB2017-00068 – Project Description-1Community Council Letter – Request Comments on Office Building PD – 1105_E_900_S – 02-02-2017

PLNSUB2017-00068 – Plan Set

Community Council Letter – Request Comments on Office Building PD – 1105_E_900_S – 02-02-2017

David Gellner, AICP, Principal Planner for Salt Lake City Corp. can be reached via email at david.gellner@slcgov.com.

 

 

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1 Comment For This Post I'd Love to Hear Yours!

  1. Robert Barth says:

    The following letter was sent to David Gellner, City Councilman Derek Kitchen, has Councilman Kitchen’s liaison to the Planning Division on February 19, 2017:

    Thank you for responding to my email.

    I am writing to provide you with a more detailed review of my concerns regarding the proposed structure at 1105 East at 900 South. I want to emphasize the inconsistencies of this proposed project with the planning and community preservation objectives of Salt Lake City.

    As you can see from the sections Salt Lake City Community Preservation Plan (revised draft, April 2012 and final draft October 2012) cited below as the Plan [ 1) ], the proposed building at 1105 E 900 South appears to disregard important elements of the Plan:
    The proposed building is inconsistent with the block face set-backs. The project requires a variance in the allowed block face set-back that is inconsistent with any existing set-back on the block bounded by 900 South, 1100 East, 1200 East, and 800 South
    The proposed height of 30 feet greatly exceeds all surrounding structures (entirely residential housing)
    The proposed dimensions of the building appear to ignore side-lot set-backs on the north and east lot boundaries
    The proposed building will block light and views from surrounding residential structures and vehicular site lines at the intersection
    The proposed uses for the building depend on high traffic, high volume businesses (restaurant, retail space, office space)
    There is a minimal parking area that would clearly not accommodate the volume of traffic generated by the proposed uses resulting in considerable overflow on-street parking day and night
    The proposed building occupies the only commercially zoned lot on the block bounded by 900 South, 1100 East, 1200 East, and 800 South (all remaining property within that block is zone residential).
    The entire block in which the commercially zoned lot is located is within the Bennion-Douglass District, a National Register Historic District and is specifically cited in Salt Lake City’s Community Preservation Plan as an historic asset.
    There is no existing or previous use president for a basement+2 story mixed commercial/entertainment use building on this block or in the immediate surrounding neighborhood.
    As you can also see from the elevation drawings of the proposed project [ 4) ], the east side of the proposed structure directly abuts an existing residence and the north side of the project is a parking lot, which directly abuts an existing residence. The architecture of the proposed structure (a blocky, contemporary adaptation of an Edwardian motif) is entirely inconsistent with the surrounding residential architecture (which is predominantly early 20th Century single story bungalow-style) and the height of the structure (30 feet) is nearly 3 times higher than any existing structure on the block. The structure that this proposed building will replace is used as a single office (with adequate off-street parking) and has been used in the distant past as a single retail space (with adequate off-street parking). The existing building has never housed multiple tenants or entertainment venues (restaurant/bar) and was required to maintain existing block set-backs when constructed [see 4) below].

    The Plan [ 3) ] acknowledges the modern additions to the Bennion-Douglass District and recommends that the existing character of this neighborhood be preserved. The proposed project represents a significant deviation from that recommendation in that it is architecturally incompatible with the surrounding structures, it exceeds the height and dimensions of the surrounding structures, it encroaches on a block face set-back that is consistent in the surrounding block and area, and it is designated for uses that are inconsistent with the expected quality of life in a residential neighborhood. Please refer to the Neighborhood Based Zoning section, particularly the portion concerning structural dimensions, from the Plan, below [ 2) ].

    I want to emphasize that I am not opposed to rational and well planned new construction in our neighborhood. In my opinion, the University Pet Clinic’s new building (900 South at the SE corner of 1000 East) is a beautiful example of new construction designed to be compatible with surrounding historic residential structures and is entirely consistent with the objectives of the Plan. Several of the repurposed older commercial and residential structures facing 900 South, between 800 East and 1100 East, are also examples of new or remodeled construction that are compatible with the surrounding neighborhood. However, I strongly object to the imposition of incompatible architecture [ 4) ] on an existing residential neighborhood, and especially when the proposed uses of the new construction will generate much higher traffic volumes (retail and office uses) and traffic, parking congestion, and noise from extended hours entertainment uses (restaurant/bar).

    As a long-time resident of the Ninth and Ninth District, and as an equally long-time home owner here (my husband and I have lived in our house, which is 4 lots east of this proposed project, since 1995), I have been encouraged by Salt Lake City’s plans for preserving and enhancing the District’s unique character. So far, the merchants of the Ninth and Ninth District have been successful in preventing incompatible commercial venues such as chain stores, fast food outlets, and franchise businesses from establishing here. I hope our city’s leadership will realize that encouraging locally owned, small, independent businesses in the Ninth and Ninth District has resulted in a very valuable community asset that benefits everyone in Salt Lake City equally.

    I am discouraged, however, by the unintended consequences of the popularity of the Ninth and Ninth District that seems now to be attracting speculative developers and incompatible commercial uses of the existing commercially zoned properties. These types of projects have brought, and will certainly bring, significant disruption to an otherwise homogeneous central city neighborhood.

    Thank you for your attention to my concerns. Please do not hesitate to maintain communications with me and to keep me informed of the progress of this proposal.

    Robert Barth